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KSV Helmstedt Gruppe

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William Franco
William Franco

Arnica Cordifolia



Arnica cordifolia, Arnica des Montagnes, Arnica Flos, Arnica Flower, Arnica fulgens, Arnica latifolia, Arnica montana, Arnica sororia, Arnikabluten, Bergwohlverieih, Doronic d'Allemagne, Fleurs d'Arnica, Herbe aux Chutes, Herbe aux Prêcheurs, Kraftwurz, Leopard's Bane, Mountain Snuff, Mountain Tobacco, Plantin des Alpes, Quinquina des Pauvres, Souci des Alpes, Tabac des Savoyards, Tabac des Vosges, Wolf's Bane, Wundkraut.




arnica cordifolia


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People take arnica by mouth for sore mouth and throat, pain such as pain after surgery or wisdom tooth removal, insect bites, painful and swollen veins near the surface of the skin (superficial phlebitis), bruising, muscle pain, vision problems due to diabetes, stroke, and for causing abortions.


  • Osteoarthritis.

Early research shows that using an arnica gel product (A. Vogel Arnica Gel, Bioforce AG, Switzerland) twice daily for 3 weeks reduces pain and stiffness and improves function in people with osteoarthritis in the hand or knee. Other research shows that using the same gel works as well as the painkiller ibuprofen in reducing pain and improving function in the hands.


  • Reducing pain, swelling, and complications of wisdom tooth removal.In most research, taking arnica by mouth does not seem to reduce pain, swelling, or complications after wisdom tooth removal. One early study suggests that taking six doses of homeopathic arnica 30C might reduce pain, but not bleeding.



  • Bruises. Most research shows that taking homeopathic arnica by mouth or applying arnica to the skin does not reduce bruising. But one study shows that taking 12 doses of a specific arnica product (SinEcch, Alpine Pharmaceuticals) might reduce bruising under the skin in women following face-lift surgery. Also, applying an arnica ointment has been shown to reduce bruising when applied twice daily for 2 weeks.

  • Vision problems due to diabetes. Early research shows that taking homeopathic arnica 5C by mouth for 6 months reduces vision problems in people with vision loss due to diabetes.

  • Muscle pain. There is inconsistent evidence on the effects of arnica on muscle pain. Some early research suggests that taking homeopathic arnica by mouth does not prevent muscle soreness. Other early research shows that applying an arnica cream (Boiron Group, France) three times daily every 24 hours after performing calf raises does not reduce muscle pain. However, other research shows that applying an arnica gel on the leg muscles immediately after running and then every 4 hours while awake for 5 days might reduce muscle pain or soreness after 3 days. Also, taking homeopathic arnica D30 by mouth reduce muscle pain if started the night before a marathon and repeated every morning and evening for 3 days.

  • Pain after surgery. Most research shows that taking homeopathic arnica by mouth slightly reduces pain after surgery. In some cases, homeopathic arnica has been used together with an arnica ointment from 72 hours after surgery for 2 weeks. But not all reduces have been positive. Some research shows that taking homeopathic arnica for 5 days does not reduce pain following surgery.

  • Stroke. Early research shows that taking one tablet of homeopathic arnica 30C under the tongue every 2 hours for six doses does not benefit people who have had a stroke.

  • Acne.

  • Chapped lips.

  • Insect bites.

  • Painful, swollen veins near the surface of the skin..

  • Sore throats.

  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of arnica for these uses.


Arnica is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in the amounts commonly found in food or when applied to unbroken skin short-term. The Canadian government, however, is concerned enough about the safety of arnica to prohibit its use as a food ingredient.


Amounts that are larger than the amount found in food are LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth. In fact, arnica is considered poisonous and has caused death. When taken by mouth it can also cause irritation of the mouth and throat, stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, skin rashes, shortness of breath, a fast heartbeat, an increase in blood pressure, heart damage, organ failure, increased bleeding, coma, and death.


Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Arnica may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before applying it to your skin. Do not take arnica by mouth.


  • APPLIED TO THE SKIN:For Osteoarthritis: An arnica gel product with a 50 gram/100 gram ratio (A. Vogel Arnica Gel, Bioforce AG, Switzerland) has been rubbed into the affected joints two to three times daily for 3 weeks.



Pinsent RJ, Baker GP, Ives G, and et al. Does arnica reduce pain and bleeding after dental extraction? A placebo controlled pilot study conducted by the Midland Homoeopathy Research Group MHRG in 1980/81. Communications of the British Homoeopathic Research Group 1986;15:3-11.


Brinkhaus B, Wilkens JM, Ludtke R, et al. Homeopathic arnica therapy in patients receiving knee surgery: results of three randomised double-blind trials. Complement Ther Med 2006;14:237-46. View abstract.


Pinsent RJ, Baker GP, Ives G, et al. Does arnica reduce pain and bleeding after dental extraction? A placebo controlled pilot study conducted by the Midland Homoeopathy Research Group MHRG in 1980/81. Communications of the British Homoeopathic Research Group 1986;15:3-11.


Stevinson C, Devaraj VS, Fountain-Barber A, et al. Homeopathic arnica for prevention of pain and bruising: randomized placebo-controlled trial in hand surgery. J R Soc Med 2003;96:60-65. View abstract.


Totonchi A, and Guyuron B. A randomized, controlled comparison between arnica and steroids in the management of postrhinoplasty ecchymosis and edema. Plast.Reconstr.Surg 2007;120:271-74. View abstract.


The arnica oils are extracted with grain alcohol and olive oil, aged and pressed in an Italian wine press. Then we add Vitamin E and medical grade essential oils of two Frankincenses and two Myrrhs. These rare and precious oils have traditional uses for wound healing and calming of spirit. We continue by adding an exquisite Kashmiri Lavender essential oil which contains unusually high levels of Linnalols, which are known in traditional herbology to calm tension and agitation and to treat nerve pain. Next we add precious Helichrysum. This essential oil was known as a superior anti-inflammatory in traditional medicine. We also add essential oils of Birch and Wintergreen which contain salicylic acid (asprin). Last in the list, but first in the amount, is our special ingredient called TLC. Each batch is hand-crafted and batch numbered by bottling date. Oils are best used in thirty months of batch date.


Collection: Arnica flowers should be harvested right when they begin to bloom. This tends to be mid-June to early-July in the PNW. Yet, year 2016, arnica flowers were blooming at the beginning of May. With that said, bloom time can be anywhere between May-July and I would be on the look-out sooner rather than later.


One great trick of harvesting can be applied for arnica. That is: when the flowers are past its prime at a low elevation, go to a higher elevation or a Northern facing slope and you may be right on cue with collection time.


In my experience, arnica flowers are best infused on site of harvest. If you are changing elevation or the flowers begin to dry, they rapidly turn into seeded puff balls that are a sneezy irritation.


Use Arnica externally. Do not use on broken skin. The whole plant is toxic if ingested and should not be taken internally unless in homeopathic remedy. The homeopathic arnica helps with trauma from an injury.


When Arnica goes to seed, they have the typical parachute fluff (pappus) like a Dandelion. Some Arnica species also hybridize and form complexes. For instance, A. cordifolia and A. latifolia often have intermediate species that are called the A. cordifolia/A. latifolia complex. 041b061a72


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